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Hair, Beauty & Fashion News

Natural Hair Growth Institute Sued
 
Chicago, Illinois, USA - According to a Chicago Sun-Times article by Lisa Donovan, when laser therapy, scalp massages and dietary supplements didn’t work, two clients of Deerfield-based Natural Hair Growth Institute held out their hands for a refund.
 
The two former clients, Virgus Jacques and Margaret Farrell, have now filed a class action breach-of-contract and consumer fraud lawsuit against the company, saying they’re part of a larger group that used the program, saw no success and, ultimately, didn’t get their thousands of dollars back despite a guarantee.
 
“NHGI’s routine practice of informing its customers that they will be refunded the total cost of the program if there is no hair growth progress by the program end — when NHGI has no intention of refunding the money — and telling clients that the program is virtually always successful — when the program many times does not work — deceives customers,” the suit states.
 
A woman who would only identify herself as general counsel for company owner Steve Bennis said “they’re all just allegations; there’s no foundation to it whatsoever to where I stand.”
 
Jacques and Farrell separately visited the Oakbrook Terrace office during summer 2008, seeking help with their thinning hair.
 
In those meetings, Bennis allegedly told Jacques the success rate was so great that only one refund had been issued by the company. He allegedly told Farrell no refunds had been issued, according to the suit filed Tuesday in Cook County Circuit Court.
 
Both were told in their separate meetings about a 100 percent money-back guarantee if the program doesn’t work.
 
But nothing worked — not the the scalp massages, the specialty hair products or the “orbit laser light” therapy, described on the company’s Web site as directing “biostimulative energy to the body’s cells, where it is converted into chemical energy to promote healthy rejuvenation of hair.”
 
Now Jacques is seeking the $11,124 he spent and Farrell wants her $8,800 back.
 
While the company’s Web site touts success stories along with the money-back guarantee, the suit claims the company “doesn’t provide such refunds and never intends to provide the refund at the time of contract formation with its clients.”
 
The Better Business Bureau revoked NHGI’s accreditation in September 2008 and has given the company an F, its lowest grade. The Illinois Department of Professional Regulation fined Bennis $10,000 in November 2008 and ordered him to stop using laser treatment for hair loss without a license, said spokeswoman Susan Hofer.
 
(2009/08/06)
 


Diamond Company Lifegem Turning Lock of Michael Jackson's Hair into Jewels
 
Chicago, Illinois, USA - One of the diamond companies in Chicago, LifeGem, has announced plans to turn some of Michael Jackson’s hair into gems.
 
The founder of LifeGem, Dean VandenBiesen has said that the company plans to extract some carbon molecules from Michael Jackson’s hair and then turn the carbon into crystals. The crystals will then be transformed into diamonds. The company has said that they have performed this technique before, with hair from Beethoven.
 
The company says that they received the hair from one of the producers of a Pepsi commercial from 1984. This was the infamous taping where Jackson’s hair caught fire. According to VandenBiesen, the company should be able to produce around 10 diamonds from the hair. There is no set price for the gems, but when they sold Beethoven’s hair diamonds, they sold for $240,000.
 
This announcement came along with several other odd Jackson body part stories. A London paper reported that Jackson’s nose was missing when he passed away. According to the paper, there was a hole where his nose should have been.
 
Another London paper reported that Jackson was going to be buried without his brain, stating it was removed by the coroner in order to perform the autopsy.
 
(2009/08/06)
 


Nashville Gets a Handle(bar) on Facial Hair
 
Minnesota, USA - According to John Lamb, in the Washington Daily Globe, the area’s biggest country music concert series is starting on August 7th, and it’s time to go over your WE Fest fashion checklist: Cowboy hat? Check. Sleeveless T-shirt? Check. Sleeveless snap-button checkered shirt? Check. Check. Check. Mustache? Check! Apparently, these days, cowboys can keep their hat on, but they’ll want to show off their facial follicles.
 
Mustaches are the must-have fashion statement for male country performers this year, with all three headliners, Toby Keith, Brooks & Dunn and Tim McGraw, sporting ’staches, as well as marquee acts Trace Adkins and Big & Rich. The relatively unknown country act Heartland could even find a spot on this year’s bill with its new single, “Mustache.”
 
It’s true that facial hair is currently sprouting a resurgence. Actors grow beards between shoots, and “beard rock” is a label slapped on loud indie bands whose members look like lumberjacks. Last November the Hotel Donaldson hosted a mustache-growing fundraiser called Mo-vember that aimed to raise funds and awareness for male prostate health.
 
But country musicians have had facial hair covered for a long time. When was the last time you saw Willie Nelson without a beard? Or William Lee Golden, the mountain man lookalike from the Oak Ridge Boys? Kenny Rogers got a new face but held on to his silvery goatee.
 
“Toby Keith has had a beard forever,” points out Chris Hanson, morning DJ at Bob 95 FM. Well, maybe not forever, but at least since his debut disc in 1993, when the now much more rugged singer was wearing bolo ties and combing his curls into a mullet.
 
The mustache has always held the upper hand, or lip, for men in country music. Singer/guitarists John Rich and Kix Brooks have never gone all in for the beard. Nor has Joe Bonsall, the Oak Ridge Boys singer who looks like former North Dakota Gov. Ed Schafer. So what’s with all the fuzz?
 
“It just gives them a rougher look,” says Hoppy Gilmore, program director for Froggy 99.9. “Maybe it’s because they’re lazy.”
 
“I could see where facial hair speaks to country people,” Stacey Lentz, owner and director of The Academie Agencie, a Fargo-based modeling and acting company. “It’s definitely more rugged, more macho.” That said, she added that such a look wouldn’t fly with area clients looking for models. Perhaps a five o’clock shadow?
 
So if facial hair isn’t popular, why do singers cling to their whiskers? “I think it would mess up their million-dollar look,” Hanson says. “Once you are who you are, it’s important not to change.”
 
“Their brand or look is already established,” says Lentz. She refers to Keith’s ever-present hat and beard. “I think that’s an important part of his brand.” And shaving, well that could cut a little too close in country.
 
“Country fans are much more passionate about the artists they follow,” adds Gilmore. “It’s hard for singers to change.” As an illustration, he points to the time when Sawyer Brown singer Mark Miller shaved his head. “Everyone was shocked by that,” Gilmore says. Not that it mattered. Miller’s reputation has always been as an energetic entertainer, not a hair model. In truth, the singer had been wearing hats for years before shaving his head.
 
And when Dierks Bentley clipped his locks after 2006’s “Long Trip Alone,” it was like the second coming of the “Felicity” fiasco. “That was major news, ‘Dierks cut his wonderful, curly hair,’ ” says Gilmore. When his new disc, “Feel That Fire,” came out in January, fans breathed easier seeing Bentley’s locks were growing back.
 
And “the look” is contagious, rubbing off a bit on the men who spin the discs. Recently, Hanson spent five weeks trying to grow a beard to no avail. “Coming from a person who can’t grow facial hair, I am extremely jealous of people like Tim McGraw who can grow a perfect goatee,” he says.
 
“I just grew my goatee back for WE Fest, and I don’t know why,” says Gilmore.
 
(2009/08/06)
 


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